Kid Crafts for the Solar Eclipse!

Hello, KUED friends!

As you may have heard, on August 21, 2017 a Total Solar Eclipse will occur and parts of the United States will fall directly under its path! This is the first time this cosmic wonder has occurred across North America since 1979, and may be your last chance to catch one for another 40 years! The direct path of the total eclipse is called the "path of totality" and spreads from Oregon across the U.S. to South Carolina. Depending on where you live in the U.S. you will be able to see some scale of this exciting event. Here in Salt Lake City and surrounding areas the best time to view the eclipse at its maximum coverage will be at 11:33 AM. So whatever you're doing that day, make sure to get outside to catch a glimpse of this awe-inspiring event! We have put together a couple of fun crafts to do with your kids to make the eclipse an educational and safe experience!

*Remember: The eclipse is not a total eclipse in Utah and the majority of the U.S. and therefore it is not safe to look directly at the sun. Click on the link below to review some of NASA's tips on how to safely view an eclipse before stepping outside.

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety 

Link to the American Astronomical Society's list of approved safety eyewear:

https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters

Craft 1) Eclipse Tracker: Track the path of the moon as it makes it's journey across the sun.

Craft 2) Box Pinhole Projector: Create a box to project the eclipse for a safe and unique way to view.

Happy Crafting, KUED'ers!

Eclipse Tracker

This craft is a fun way to easily teach young kids the concept of what is happening in the sky during an eclipse. They can help cut out the shapes and even decorate the sun and moon with faces. As the eclipse makes its way across the sky, use the eclipse tracker to chart its path and build the excitement!

Supplies needed:

1 piece each of black, white, and yellow construction paper

Tape

Scissors

1 brad pin

Mug

Cut out a circle by tracing around the mouth of the mug using the white paper for the moon and the yellow paper for the sun. 

Cut out 2 ruler-sized rectangles from the black paper. 

Tape the circles to the tops of the rectangles.

Place the cutouts directly on top of each other, the moon on top of the sun, and connect them at the bottom using the brad pin.

The moon piece should now be able to slide freely from side to side on top of the sun piece, mimicking the moon's path across the sun!

 

 

 

Box Pinhole Projector

The Box Pinhole Projector craft is a fun and unique way to safely view the passing eclipse. The most fun part of this craft for the kids might be decorating the box. Before completing the craft, get out the markers, crayons, and glitter and let the kids' creative sides flow as they decorate the most out-of-this-world box they can imagine! 

Supplies Needed:

A long cardboard box

Scissors

Duct tape

Aluminum foil

Pin or thumbtack

Box cutter or sharp knife

Sheet of white paper

Prep your box: A longer box provides a better projection. Prep the box by securely closing and taping the top and all sides with duct tape. Leave the bottom flaps of the box open and tape them together to make the box deeper. Place the box over your head to check for incoming light – tape any area permitting light with tape. 

Cut a rectangular hole toward the top at one end of the box using the box cutters or sharp knife. *PARENT ONLY STEP

Using the scissors, cut out a piece of aluminum foil slightly larger than the rectangular hole in the box, making sure the foil is completely flat and not crinkled.

Tape the foil over the rectangular hole in the box.

Use the pin to poke a tiny hole in the center of the foil.

Tape the white sheet of paper inside of the box on the opposite end. 

To view the eclipse: Stand with your back toward the Sun. Place the box over your head with the pinhole toward the Sun. Adjust your position until you see a small projection of the eclipsed Sun on the paper inside the box. Enjoy the show!

You can also check out our KUED 7 program covering the eclipse!

Nova: Eclipse over America

Airing: Monday Aug. 21, 8PM and Wednesday Aug. 23, 9PM.