Summer of Space | KUED.org

Summer of Space

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, KUED is celebrating with the Summer of Space, a series of programs, events, and outreach initiatives designed to bring viewers back to that historic day in July 1969, when the first man walked on the moon, and anything seemed possible.

KUED’s Summer of Space is produced in conjunction with the launch of Chasing the Moon, a new three-part documentary series from American Experience that relives the history of the space race, from its earliest beginnings to the monumental achievement of the first lunar landing and beyond.

American Experience: Chasing The Moon

American Experience - Chasing The Moon - Premiering June 8

American Experience - Chasing The Moon

The series recasts the Space Age as a fascinating stew of scientific innovation, political calculation, media spectacle, visionary impulses and personal drama. Utilizing a visual feast of previously overlooked and lost archival material — much of which has never before been seen by the public — the film features a diverse cast of characters who played key roles in these historic events. Among those included are astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Frank Borman and Bill Anders; Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet premier and a leading Soviet rocket engineer; Poppy Northcutt, a 25-year old “mathematics whiz” who gained worldwide attention as the first woman to serve in the all-male bastion of NASA’s Mission Control; and Ed Dwight, the Air Force pilot selected by the Kennedy administration to train as America’s first black astronaut.

Credit: Courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, November 16, 1963

Explore the early days of the space race, the struggle to catch up with the Soviet Union and the enormous stakes in the quest to reach the moon. This episode reveals both the breathtaking failures and successes of the developing U.S. space program.

Earthrise - Image Credit: NASA

Discover what it took to beat the Soviet Union to the moon in the space race. In the turbulent and troubled '60s, the U.S. space program faced tragedy with Apollo 1, but made a triumphant comeback with Apollo 8.

Experience the triumph of the first moon landing, witnessed by the largest TV audience in history. But dreams of space dramatically intersect with dreams of democracy, raising questions of national priorities and national identity.

Light

Moon Memory Highlights

Moon Memories

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

It was one of the most special times of my life and changed my life in many ways.

Bear Backer

I was on a road trip to the Boy Scout National Jamboree to Farragut State Park and while there, a member of our troop, threw lighter fluid across the campfire and onto my leg. 2nd to 3rd burns on my leg. Got a cane so I could walk and still have, and used many times since .

So I got to watch the landing on a big screen at the Jamboree up close to the screen with several other handicapped individuals. It was one of the most special times of my life and changed my life in many ways.

My KGB minder was outraged that I would show this film and they protested to the U.S. Embassy.

Deon Greer

My Name is Dr. Deon C. Greer, a retired professor of Geography from Weber State University. I was granted a U.S.-U.S.S.R. exchange professor award to spend a 12 month period in the Soviet Union for the 1977-78 school year at the Water Problems Institute.

While there, I was asked by my Russian colleagues to show the U.S. Moon Landing video as well as the U.S. Soviet space coupling and the 45-Star promotional video (about the State of Utah). The Soviet government refused to allow the showing of the Moon Landing, but I was able to get a copy from the U.S. Embassy, which I presented to a standing-room only audience at the Water Problems Institute. The members of the institute were very excited to see what very few of their fellow Russians were able to experience and they expressed their gratitude profusely to me.

My KGB minder was outraged that I would show this film and they protested to the U.S. Embassy. A meeting was held by the embassy in which the vote was almost unanimous that I should be sent home. However, the American Ambassador stood up for me, but I was told not to do anything which might threaten the Exchange Program we had with the Soviets. I tried to live up to this requirement, but I did check out some books for friends written by Americans among other other things which displeased my KGB minder. Nevertheless, I was happy to do what I did and felt that I accomplished something that furthered an understanding between our two countries.

We had a portable radio broadcasting the moon landing live.

Dave Schoenfeld

I was a sixteen year old high school student working at Lagoon resort for the summer season. I was working on the miniature car Speedway ride. This ride had a public address system, complete with microphones to exhort the riders to keep the cars moving because they would constantly stop and bump into each other.

We had a portable radio broadcasting the moon landing live. When Armstrong was officially out of the LEM and made his historic statement, I was able to tell everyone within hearing distance that 'man' had landed on the moon.

I remember telling her she wouldn't remember it, but I was not going to have her miss witnessing this historic event.

Peggy Childs

The following message is found in my daughter's baby book. The paper it was written on is aging; now looking wrinkled and discolored around the edges. I wrote it after she sat on my lap in front of the television. I remember telling her she wouldn't remember it, but I was not going to have her miss witnessing this historic event.

July 21, 1969
I think a special page should be added for special events in my daughter's life.

At exactly 7 1/2 months old, she watched with us the first moon landing and moon walk. This is a very exciting day in the world and ushers in a new era for mankind. I am a bit envious when I think of all the things she will get to see and do in her lifetime.

Some doubt it, but she always tells people she watched the moon landing.

At the time of the Apollo 11 moon landing in July of 1969 I was working for the Nixon Administration at the White House in Washington, D.C.

Richard Matson

At the time of the Apollo 11 moon landing in July of 1969 I was working for the Nixon Administration at the White House in Washington, D.C. I was a CIA Intelligence Officer who had recently been selected to work in the White House Situation Room.


I was on duty at the time the astronauts landed on the moon, and was still on duty about six hours later when Neil Armstrong followed by Buzz Aldrin took their first steps on the lunar surface. Like millions of people around the world I watched the television coverage of this monumental event as it occurred. For me it had special significance because President Nixon addressed the nation and world and spoke to the astronauts on the moon from his Oval Office, which was only about 200 feet from where I was working. One of my responsibilities at the time was to monitor press reports of significant events as they were printed out on dedicated newswire teletype machines (Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, etc.), and then inform senior White House officials of important developments. In this instance there was nothing I could add to what an estimated 650 million people around the world watched on live television originating from the White House and the moon.

For about one week following the successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean and the completion of the Apollo 11 mission I was assigned to assist a White House historian process the large influx of congratulatory letters from many of the world's most prominent leaders. These letters eventually went to the Nixon Presidential Library. But that was not the end of my Apollo 11 story. On July 20, 1979 Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins were invited to the White House by President Jimmy Carter to participate in a Rose Garden ceremony in observance of the tenth anniversary of the first moon landing. Prior to their meeting with the President and the press I had the wonderful opportunity to meet and speak with each one of them and to also get their autographs. This brief encounter at the White House with the Apollo 11 astronauts was one of the most memorable experiences of my life.

Our problem was that we only owned an old black and white TV and as yet hadn’t been able to afford to buy an outside antenna for the roof.

Judith Lovett

In 1969 at the time of the moon landing, I was newly married and living in the United Kingdom. I now live in St. George, Utah.


I remember feeling very excited about the whole space program and had followed prior missions in the news, but the moon landing really caught our imagination and my husband and I really wanted to be sure to see the TV broadcast. Our problem was that we only owned an old black and white TV and as yet hadn’t been able to afford to buy an outside antenna for the roof. Undaunted, my husband found an old metal fire guard which he positioned in the loft. I would stand at the bottom of the stairs checking the TV picture while he found the optimal position for the fire guard. Communication between us was quite noisy as you can imagine. I guess we were very low tech in those days, but come the day of the broadcast our makeshift system worked well for us and we were able to share this wonderful historic event along with the rest of the world. I’ve often reflected on this improbable situation many times since. Congratulations to the astronauts and technicians for their courage and achievements.

Pages

Moon-related Events

Movies on the Plaza - First Man

Wednesday
Jul 17
2019
7:30pm
to
11:15pm

Join us under the stars for a screening of First Man in the Olympic Plaza at The Gateway. KUED and Clark Planetarium will have giveaways and activities for kids and families before the film starts. Click here for more details....

Moon Landing Anniversary Celebration

Saturday
Jul 20
2019
11:00am
to
3:00pm

Join KUED Kids for a full day of family-friendly activities, celebrating the Apollo 11 moon landing anniversary at Clark Planetarium! Families and space enthusiasts of all ages will enjoy moon-themed activities, try on a pair of virtual reality goggles to experience moon gravity, and more! The celebration starts with a free screening of Ready Jet Go!...

Dark
Earthrise - Image Credit: NASA

Commemorate the Moon Landing With Kids

Dark
#000000

Dark Skies Stories from KUED

Our Sponsor