Summer of Space

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, KUED is celebrating with the Summer of Space, a series of programs, events, and outreach initiatives designed to bring viewers back to that historic day in July 1969, when the first man walked on the moon, and anything seemed possible.

KUED’s Summer of Space is produced in conjunction with the launch of Chasing the Moon, a new three-part documentary series from American Experience that relives the history of the space race, from its earliest beginnings to the monumental achievement of the first lunar landing and beyond.

American Experience: Chasing The Moon

American Experience - Chasing The Moon - Premiering June 8

American Experience - Chasing The Moon

The series recasts the Space Age as a fascinating stew of scientific innovation, political calculation, media spectacle, visionary impulses and personal drama. Utilizing a visual feast of previously overlooked and lost archival material — much of which has never before been seen by the public — the film features a diverse cast of characters who played key roles in these historic events. Among those included are astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Frank Borman and Bill Anders; Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet premier and a leading Soviet rocket engineer; Poppy Northcutt, a 25-year old “mathematics whiz” who gained worldwide attention as the first woman to serve in the all-male bastion of NASA’s Mission Control; and Ed Dwight, the Air Force pilot selected by the Kennedy administration to train as America’s first black astronaut.

Explore the early days of the space race, the struggle to catch up with the Soviet Union and the enormous stakes in the quest to reach the moon. This episode reveals both the breathtaking failures and successes of the developing U.S. space program.

Discover what it took to beat the Soviet Union to the moon in the space race. In the turbulent and troubled '60s, the U.S. space program faced tragedy with Apollo 1, but made a triumphant comeback with Apollo 8.

Experience the triumph of the first moon landing, witnessed by the largest TV audience in history. But dreams of space dramatically intersect with dreams of democracy, raising questions of national priorities and national identity.

Moon Memory Highlights

Moon Memories

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

It turned out that he had been a part of the Pearl Harbor attack.

Stephen Warner

It was a typical, hot July night in Tokyo. My companion and I had spent long hours contacting people on the streets and door-to-door. I had been in the Japan Mission nine months and was slowly picking up the Japanese language. I could speak conversational Japanese at a superficial level.

As we returned to our apartment near Senzokuike, we stopped at a shop near the train station. We were going to buy some fish, cooked on the hibachi, and some fruit. As we entered the shop to make our purchase, we noticed there were several customers and the shop keeper huddled around a tiny Sony television perched up in the corner of the shop. Neil Armstrong had just jumped onto the moon and had planted an American flag.

Everyone was mesmerized at seeing a man on the moon. As people expressed their astonishment at the seeing the first man on the moon, I teased the owner by saying in my remedial Japanese, “It looks like the moon is now American.” He laughed at my joke. We both expressed how extraordinary the scene on the television had been.

I asked if he had ever been to America. He said that he had—once. I asked him where he had visited. “Hawaii,” he stated. I asked which island he had visited. He said that he didn’t land. He just flew over. It turned out that he had been a part of the Pearl Harbor attack. There was no animosity or ill feelings. He just stated what had happened. We became friends as he would see us nearly every day—the foreign missionaries for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

50 years later, I was in Japan on university business and thought I would take the train to Senzokuike to see if the shop I remembered as the place where I saw Neil Armstrong land on the moon was still there. As I came down the stairs of the train station, I was sad to see the shop was gone, replaced by two American fast-food restaurants. Nevertheless…I have fond feelings for the place where I saw the miracle of the man-on-the-moon.

My father hooked up our tv outside in the summer because it was too hot in the house to watch.

Celia Ward

I sat outside on our patio in Ogden with my sister and parents on that sweltering July evening. My father hooked up our tv outside in the summer because it was too hot in the house to watch. I was 20 years old that summer, a young wife newly pregnant. No one knew my secret but me.

I remember looking at the moon that night with my family knowing that life would be very different for me and very different for our world. My son was born in March of 1970.

We watched the moon landing on a small black-and-white TV

Jo Ellen Ashworth

I was 23, in a motel in St. George, with my aunt from Cedar City, Marla Ence Arns. It was about 2pm. We watched the moon landing on a small black-and-white TV.

The sailors began giving us Americans rum from the ship's stores.

Eugene Castellano

I was in the US AIR FORCE on a TDY assignment to the Scottish coast on an English Naval station, HMS FULMAR. When Mr. Armstrong stepped on the moon, the sailors began giving us Americans rum from the ship's stores and declaring us great “Yanks”. The celebration lasted well into the night.

I remember feeling very proud st that time, in spite of Vietnam, to be an American serviceman.

When Apollo 11 splashed down, there were BIG BIG parties!

Richard Gregersen

When Apollo 11 landed on the moon, I was working in the Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg. 30 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston,Texas. It was very exciting to be in the MCC during Apollo 8 through 12 missions.

Our programming team had to provide 24 hour coverage of the Univac 494 communications computers located in the basement. It was especially tense when the primary computer faulted and switched to the back-up as then the flight director would call to find out what happened! When Apollo 11 splashed down, there were BIG BIG parties!

I remember the ticker tape parade held for the astronauts down Broadway in New York City.

Connie Wilcox

My memories include watching the lunar landing and hearing Neil Armstrong saying "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." I also remember the ticker tape parade held for the astronauts down Broadway in New York City.

My first job was in an office building on Broadway and we looked out our window to see the incredible amount of paper - including actual ticker tape - "snowing" from windows. By the end of the work day, the streets and sidewalks were completely cleaned off.

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