Summer of Space | KUED.org

Summer of Space

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, KUED is celebrating with the Summer of Space, a series of programs, events, and outreach initiatives designed to bring viewers back to that historic day in July 1969, when the first man walked on the moon, and anything seemed possible.

KUED’s Summer of Space is produced in conjunction with the launch of Chasing the Moon, a new three-part documentary series from American Experience that relives the history of the space race, from its earliest beginnings to the monumental achievement of the first lunar landing and beyond.

American Experience: Chasing The Moon

American Experience - Chasing The Moon - Premiering June 8

American Experience - Chasing The Moon

The series recasts the Space Age as a fascinating stew of scientific innovation, political calculation, media spectacle, visionary impulses and personal drama. Utilizing a visual feast of previously overlooked and lost archival material — much of which has never before been seen by the public — the film features a diverse cast of characters who played key roles in these historic events. Among those included are astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Frank Borman and Bill Anders; Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet premier and a leading Soviet rocket engineer; Poppy Northcutt, a 25-year old “mathematics whiz” who gained worldwide attention as the first woman to serve in the all-male bastion of NASA’s Mission Control; and Ed Dwight, the Air Force pilot selected by the Kennedy administration to train as America’s first black astronaut.

Credit: Courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, November 16, 1963

Explore the early days of the space race, the struggle to catch up with the Soviet Union and the enormous stakes in the quest to reach the moon. This episode reveals both the breathtaking failures and successes of the developing U.S. space program.

Earthrise - Image Credit: NASA

Discover what it took to beat the Soviet Union to the moon in the space race. In the turbulent and troubled '60s, the U.S. space program faced tragedy with Apollo 1, but made a triumphant comeback with Apollo 8.

Experience the triumph of the first moon landing, witnessed by the largest TV audience in history. But dreams of space dramatically intersect with dreams of democracy, raising questions of national priorities and national identity.

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Moon Memory Highlights

Moon Memories

TELL US YOUR STORY: What do you remember from the moon landing?

"I had chills down my spine."

Paula Massey

I was working at my uncle's cabins and snack bar for the summer. I had waited tables all day and my feet were just killing me. Then he closed everything up and we all retreated to a little cabin and watched Armstrong take that first "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." The TV was a tiny B&W and it was so grainy.

Nevertheless, I had chills down my spine, cried, and was so hopeful for a new future.

"The announcer stopped the racing and held the microphone next to a radio that was describing the Landing."

John Ellison

I was at Lion's Drag Strip and a few minutes before the landing the announcer stopped the racing and held the microphone next to a radio that was describing the Landing. Everyone stood around intensely listening to the landing and when they landed safely everyone went wild cheering and applauding.

That memory is burned into my brain and something I will never forget.

"I still am sad that Mars has yet to be visited by man."

Margine Spotts

I was 16 and had been watching the launches since they began with Mercury, continued through Gemini and finally Apollo. My thought as I stood outside my home looking at the moon was why there and not Mars first. I still am sad that Mars has yet to be visited by man.

"One man, who was blind, had tears running down his face, and said that he wished for just that moment he could see, just so he could see the landing."

Leanne Bedell

I remember it so well. I was enrolled in BYU’s nursing program at the time but was home for the summer, working in a nursing home. When the moon landing happened, all the residents who were able came to the dining room to watch it on television.

They were all quite elderly and none of them had imagined that they would ever see something like this in their lifetime. One man, who was blind, had tears running down his face, and said that he wished for just that moment he could see, just so he could see the landing.

"Sat on the floor of my mother's living room in Elko and watched the 'One small step' as it happened."

Patrick Wiggins

Although in the USAF and stationed at Mt. Home AFB in Idaho I was on leave at home in Elko and just three months from deployment to Vietnam. Sat on the floor of my mother's living room in Elko and watched the "One small step" as it happened.

"I think we students (packed house) watched the landing in the lunch room."

Michael Clements

Simple. I was a student at the University of Utah living in the dorms. I think we students (packed house) watched the landing in the lunch room.

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Moon-related Events

Moon Landing Anniversary Celebration

Saturday
Jul 20
2019
11:00am
to
3:00pm

Join KUED Kids for a full day of family-friendly activities, celebrating the Apollo 11 moon landing anniversary at Clark Planetarium! Families and space enthusiasts of all ages will enjoy moon-themed activities, try on a pair of virtual reality goggles to experience moon gravity, and more! The celebration starts with a free screening of Ready Jet Go!...

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Earthrise - Image Credit: NASA

Commemorate the Moon Landing With Kids

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